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Maxximum Sound!

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You probably don’t know but I used to be in charge of all digital marketing of a cinema group called Kinepolis. They own part of another group in Germany that is called Cinemaxx. To cut a long story short, that’s why I have a kind of dual interest in the video below. First of all it features a Mustang with a nice sound and secondly the spot is created by that same Cinemaxx I just mentioned to promote a new sound experience in their theatres:

“Introducing a new sound system by Meyer Sound to their 30 movie theaters, CinemaxX commissioned the specialists from Schönheitsfarm, Acrobat and White Horse Music to create a spot all the way from concept to execution that makes full use of the new “MAXXIMUM SOUND” experience.
To visualize the crystal clear and highly differentiated sound we turned to a technique very popular in film making and translated it into the acoustic world:
Creating high speed shots to experience high speed sound. Through the use of slow motion we were able to break down complex noises into the various parts they are composed of. Take rain for example: What appears to us as just white noise is actually the sum of thousands of raindrops hitting a multitude of objects and surfaces.”

Enjoy! And turn up the sound.

Brent Mustangburger

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Meet Brent Mustangburger (voiced by Brent Musburger), a new character for the sequel to the Disney Pixar hit, CARS. CARS brings some style with a 1964½ Mustang that plays an well known sports broadcaster.

Brent Mustangburger is an American sports broadcasting icon. With the self-proclaimed “best stall in the garage,” the excitable 1964½ Ford Mustang is widely considered one of the most recognizable voices in the history of automobile sports television and associated with some of the most memorable moments in modern sports.

Looks like I will have to join my kids to the movies once more this summer ;)

[Via Mustang Evolution]

How Steve McQueen asked his ‘Bullitt’ Mustang back

… and didn’t get it. It appears to be so that in 1977 Steve McQueen wrote a letter to who appears to be the owner of the famous Bullitt Mustang used in the movie. Well one of them, as there were 2 different cars prepped for the movie, we’re talking about the one that wasn’t used for the stunts… and thus survived.

Who the owner was (and probably still is) nobody seems to know, but it is clear that they kept the Mustang, despite Steve’s request.

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Nice find from the car maniacs of Drivr.

The birth of the Mustang

“This is the spirit of the wild Mustang”. A conversation at today’s classic car show in Ghent learned that not everybody knows that the Mustang like we know is actually quite different from the original Mustang concept car. Here’s a great video of the real ‘first’ Mustang.

“One of the treats in the video is seeing Phil Clark at work on the original Mustang logo. We also see Clark hard at work shaping the clay on the buck and his sketches adorn the walls of the studio. It’s a tribute to an extremely gifted designer who died when he was only 32 but left behind a legacy of automotive design and a daughter, Holly, who’s dedicated to making sure the world remembers her father’s contribution to the Mustang. This Ford PR film captures the inside story of the team’s efforts that put the first Mustang on the road.”

Chasing the ghosts of ‘Bullitt’

The Wall Street Journal drives with Loren Janes, now 79 year old former stunt double of many movies including the incredible ‘Bullitt’. Time to debunk some myths:

As Mr. Janes and I drove around the city, three myths were shattered. First, despite the hype, McQueen did not do his own driving in the movie’s most dangerous scenes. "Steve was a great driver, but he was only behind the wheel for about 10% of what you see on screen," said Mr. Janes, who was McQueen’s stunt double from 1959 to 1980. "He drove in scenes that required closeups—but not in the ones that could kill him. Steve always asked me first whether a stunt was too dangerous for him to take on."

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When you’re strange: The Blue Lady

A colleague of mine shared this little Youtube clip with me the other day, Jim Morrison from The Doors driving his 1967 Shelby GT500.

Jim Morrison driving his 1967 Shelby G.T. 500. The clip is from the film “When You’re Strange” (directed by Tom DiCillo) which is in turn borrowed from the movie “HWY: An American Pastoral” which Jim made in 1969 with some friends. This footage is considerably clearer than my previous post of Jim driving the car. Go full screen with this clip, the resolution is killer. You can even see dust on the car it’s so crisp and clear.

I did a lot of research on the Shelby and all indications are it was trashed after Jim hit a telephone pole when he was drunk. He had clipped it before, but on that occasion he bent the frame, ending his time with The Blue Lady (his name for the car). Jim met the same fate as the Shelby two years later, though some think he’s still alive. It’s kind of fitting as some people are convinced this car still exists. Maybe he’s still driving it.

Shelby fans, note the car has no front grille emblem, no trunk emblem, small lettered Speedway 350 tires, uneven, hammered rear exhaust outlets, comfortweave seats, fender mounted antenna, and half the molding on the driver’s side taillight is missing. LOL. Best of all, it’s a 4-speed nightmist blue car with parchment interior and 10 spoke wheels. He knew how to pick ‘em, huh? That’s the way I would have ordered it. If only you could go back in time!

An identical car sold at Barrett-Jackson auctions for $330,000 in January, 2008.

Bullitt Special: behind the scenes

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Jon Patrick of The Selvedge Yard (fascinating blog btw) posted an article from The Muscle Car Review (March 1987) that was titled ‘The Greatest Chase of All’ and that was fully dedicated to a behind the scenes look of how they filmed Bullitt, the grandaddy of car pursuit movies. Required reading for all of us.

We set out to learn what the recipe is for such a successful chase sequence. What we found out was that there is none; it was pretty much a hit and miss thing and, as Ron Riner put it, “other people have tried to put the same combination together to get the same results and haven’t really done it. Before we’d shoot a scene, everyone, the location people, the police department, the stuntmen, the director and Steve, would get into discussions. We realized we didn’t know what to do because no one had ever done this before.” What hadn’t been done before was a chase scene, done “at speed”(up to 110 miles per hour) through the city streets and not on a movie studio back lot. Bud Elkins said, “I think it was the first time they did a complete car chase at normal camera speed. What you saw is what really happened. It was real!”

Don’t wait any longer, head over to The Selvedge Yard to read the whole piece.

Bullitt special: The Making Of

aka Steve McQueens ‘commitment to reality’.

“Short film on the making of the 1968 feature ‘Bullitt’. If you think you know street racing and fast cars, you should check in for a quick history lesson.”

Click on the image to see the video:

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“When megastar Steve McQueen and director Peter Yates set out to make Bullitt, the object was to make a "real" film with one of the most ambitious chase scenes in the history of cinema. And they did it before computers and CGI enabled filmmakers to do the lion’s share of the dangerous work with the click of a mouse. The chase scene in Bullitt remains an all-time classic, with McQueen’s 1968 Mustang Bullitt going head-to-head with a black 1968 Charger R/T 440 Magnum. The chase was real, with speeds surpassing 100 mph on the hilly streets of San Francisco. Steve McQueen teamed up with stunt driver extraordinaire Bill Hickman, and the other cars in the scene were driven by eight of the best stunt drivers around to create an epic high speed chase for the ages.”

That clearly worked out nicely :)

[Via Autoblog]

Bullitt special: the chase

Yes I’ve posted this one here before, probably even more than once. But you cannot expect me to make a special around the movie without showing you the chase again don’t you think? And yes I know you’ve seen it before, just watch it once more – it still is the best car chase of all times remember ;)

Bullitt is a 1968 thriller film starring Steve McQueen. It was distributed by Warner Bros. The director was Peter Yates. The story was adapted for the screen by Alan Trustman and Harry Kleiner, based on the novel titled Mute Witness (1963) by Robert L. Fish (aka Robert L. Pike). Lalo Schifrin wrote the original music score, a memorable mix of jazz, brass and percussion. The movie won the Academy Award for Best Film Editing (Frank P. Keller) and was nominated for Best Sound. Writers Trustman and Kleiner won a 1969 Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for Best Motion Picture Screenplay. Bullitt is most-remembered for its central car chase scene through the streets of downtown San Francisco, one of the earliest and most influential car chase sequences in movie history.[1] The scene had Bullitt in a dark “Highland Green” 1968 Ford Mustang G.T.390 Fastback, chasing two hit-men in a “Tuxedo Black” 1968 Dodge Charger R/T 440 Magnum. (In honor of the Mustang in the film, the Ford Motor Company produced a limited edition 2001 Ford Mustang GT “Bullitt Mustang,” which took styling cues from the ’68 movie car and even mimicked its exhaust note).

Bullitt Special: Intro

The greatest car chase of all times? You bet it is. The next couple of days will be dedicated to the movie and the car chase in particular. Over the last few months I collected some cool content that every Mustang and Bullitt geek will definitely like.

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Stay tuned!

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